Abstract/Details

Mass customization performance index


2005 2005

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Abstract (summary)

Mass Customization combines the most desirable attributes of craft manufacturing and mass production into one system. It is a technique that allows suppliers to provide customized products to their customers without sacrificing cost and lead time. Current literature describes what Mass Customization organizations are capable of offering their customers, but there is little exploration of how organizations are able to operate efficiently under these conditions.

This research explores the business strategies that are used to enable Mass Customization attributes. A quantitative methodology is developed to analyze the cause and effect relationships between enabling business strategies and Mass Customization attributes. The Analytic Hierarchy Process is used to weight the importance of the attributes and the strategies. Multi-Attribute Utility Theory is used to score an organization's performance level for strategies. These weights and scores are rolled up into a single Mass Customization Performance Index, indicating an organization's Mass Customization capabilities.

Using the Mass Customization Performance Index, the strategy which has the most significant impact on Mass Customization capabilities is identified. This allows organization's to prioritize their strategy improvement efforts to yield the desired level of Mass Customization capabilities.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Industrial engineering
Classification
0546: Industrial engineering
Identifier / keyword
Applied sciences; Analytic hierarchy; Mass customization
Title
Mass customization performance index
Author
Welborn, Cliff Alan
Number of pages
230
Publication year
2005
Degree date
2005
School code
2502
Source
DAI-B 66/06, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780542190421, 0542190427
Advisor
Liles, Donald H.
University/institution
The University of Texas at Arlington
University location
United States -- Texas
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3179136
ProQuest document ID
305355597
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305355597
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