Abstract/Details

Job-related stressors and domestic violence within police families


2005 2005

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Abstract (summary)

This thesis investigates the role of occupational stress as a source of domestic violence in police families using the theoretical constructs of General Strain Theory. General Strain Theory is compatible with the stress-diathesis model but improves upon it by theoretically explaining police deviance. It looks at how stress is appraised by an officer's locus of control orientation, affecting the formation of job-related strains, the negative psychological consequences of strain and risk factors that directly affect the incidence of domestic violence.

This research used a secondary data set compiled from a study that examined police stress, coping behaviors, and psychological effects of domestic violence among a large sample of police officers. The findings from this study replicated earlier research, but found that an officer's locus of control plays a pivotal role in stress appraisals, the negative affects, and levels of domestic violence. The results suggest that law enforcement organizations need to increase the scope of attention towards the physical and psychological health of officers to reduce domestic violence in the homes of police officers.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Criminology;
Social psychology;
Families & family life;
Personal relationships;
Sociology
Classification
0627: Criminology
0451: Social psychology
0628: Families & family life
0628: Personal relationships
0628: Sociology
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences; Psychology
Title
Job-related stressors and domestic violence within police families
Author
Zavala, Quentin
Number of pages
157
Publication year
2005
Degree date
2005
School code
6080
Source
MAI 44/03M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
054236879X, 9780542368790
Advisor
Deschenes, Elizabeth
University/institution
California State University, Long Beach
University location
United States -- California
Degree
M.S.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1429349
ProQuest document ID
305369086
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305369086
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