Abstract/Details

Factors related to changes among African American women participating in substance abuse treatment: An observational study


2005 2005

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Abstract (summary)

The rate of African American women exposed to HIV/AIDS through high risk sexual behaviors particularly from drug-related behaviors is increasing. This study examined an archival data set and specific variables not previous studied in a Center for Substance Abuse Treatment research project (grant # TI12653-01). Starting October 2000, 386 women were enrolled in various treatment services. This study consisted of the full range of substance abuse treatment, health education classes and HIV counseling, and testing services. Participants were interviewed using the Global Assessment of Individual Needs (Dennis, Titus, White, Unsicker, & Hodgkins, 2002), at the time of enrollment into the program and six months later. Implications of this study tend to indicate that among substance users who are engaged in high risk behaviors, one effective way to reduce the committing of high risk behaviors is to reduce or stop the use of alcohol and drugs.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Psychotherapy;
Social psychology;
Mental health
Classification
0622: Psychotherapy
0451: Social psychology
0347: Mental health
Identifier / keyword
Health and environmental sciences; Psychology; African-American; HIV risk; Immune deficiency; Injection drug users; Substance abuse treatment; Women addicts
Title
Factors related to changes among African American women participating in substance abuse treatment: An observational study
Author
Lustig, Dan
Number of pages
39
Publication year
2005
Degree date
2005
School code
1143
Source
DAI-B 66/05, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780542134364, 0542134365
Advisor
Dyson, Vida
University/institution
Adler School of Professional Psychology
University location
United States -- Illinois
Degree
Psy.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3175082
ProQuest document ID
305393214
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305393214
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