Abstract/Details

The specificity and mechanism of sudden gains


2005 2005

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Abstract (summary)

Sudden gain, a sudden and large drop in symptom severity in one between sessions interval, was first discovered in cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for depression (Tang & DeRubeis, 1999). Since then, sudden gains have been found in several different therapies for depression, and their mechanisms seem to be associated with specific therapy factors. The present paper investigated further into the specificity and mechanism of sudden gains through two studies. In study 1, we examined to what factors the patients attribute their sudden gains, and when sudden gains occur (within the pregain session vs. within the between-session interval following the pregain session). Consistent with prior study based on observers' ratings, the patients in the sample also attributed their sudden gains to behavior changes. The patients also did not attribute the majority of sudden gains to positive life events. Patients' mood ratings at the beginning and end of session also show that sudden gains occurred in the between-session interval following the pregain session. Study 2 investigated sudden gains in CBT for panic disorder at a university training clinic. The results suggest that sudden gains also exist in CBT for panic disorder, and they appear very similar to those found in CBT for depression. The findings offer empirical support to the specific mechanism of CBT, and they suggest that sudden gains might be a general phenomenon in the treatment of affect disorders.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Psychotherapy
Classification
0622: Psychotherapy
Identifier / keyword
Psychology; Depression; Panic disorder; Sudden gains
Title
The specificity and mechanism of sudden gains
Author
Pham, Thu Dan
Number of pages
67
Publication year
2005
Degree date
2005
School code
0163
Source
DAI-B 67/01, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780542488580
Advisor
Tang, Tony
University/institution
Northwestern University
University location
United States -- Illinois
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3201007
ProQuest document ID
305405245
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305405245
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