Abstract/Details

Systems approach to metro network design


2005 2005

Other formats: Order a copy

Abstract (summary)

In spite of their permanence and strong impacts on cities, some aspects of metro systems have attracted rather limited attention in the field of urban transportation planning. Literature on experiences and knowledge regarding the planning, design and evaluation of various metro line/network forms is difficult to locate. Furthermore, technological and operational innovations are rapidly changing many aspects of metro planning and design requirements, yet their impacts—and new geometric network forms they enable—have not been clearly articulated in existing theory and methodology for systematic metro network design and evaluation.

This research facilitates a systems approach to metro network planning, and develops metro network design measures to consider in planning and evaluation. The research utilizes theoretical analyses and empirical survey of metro operators, and examines the planning process, different geometric line/network forms and their operational characteristics. Systems insights and new considerations stemming from this work are expected to assist in better planning and design of metro lines and networks, and help achieve a higher level of metro performance and operation.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Urban planning;
Area planning & development;
Transportation
Classification
0999: Urban planning
0999: Area planning & development
0709: Transportation
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences; Line form; Metro planning; Network design
Title
Systems approach to metro network design
Author
Synn, Jienki
Number of pages
267
Publication year
2005
Degree date
2005
School code
0175
Source
DAI-A 66/06, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780542200618, 0542200619
Advisor
Vuchic, Vukan R.
University/institution
University of Pennsylvania
University location
United States -- Pennsylvania
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3179820
ProQuest document ID
305414458
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305414458
Access the complete full text

You can get the full text of this document if it is part of your institution's ProQuest subscription.

Try one of the following:

  • Connect to ProQuest through your library network and search for the document from there.
  • Request the document from your library.
  • Go to the ProQuest login page and enter a ProQuest or My Research username / password.