Abstract/Details

Effects of upper respiratory tract disease on the demographics of a gopher tortoise (<i>Gopherus polyphemus</i>) population in south Florida


2005 2005

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Abstract (summary)

Upper Respiratory Tract Disease is a highly contagious bacteria observed in gopher tortoise populations in Florida as early as 1989. In this study, 40 plasma samples were collected from a population to determine the effects on different age classes and genders. Results suggest adults are more susceptible to the disease and there is not a significant difference in the number of infected males and females. All subadults tested in this population were free of the disease. The effect on growth rate was negligible; seropositive and seronegative individuals did not exhibit statistically significant differences in growth rates. In addition, an analysis of home range size reveals that adult males have the greatest home range size, which may provide a route for disease transmission to other adults. The long-term effects of URTD are still unknown; however, this data suggests a zero known mortality rate due to URTD over a four-year period.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Zoology;
Forestry
Classification
0472: Zoology
0478: Forestry
Identifier / keyword
Biological sciences
Title
Effects of upper respiratory tract disease on the demographics of a gopher tortoise (<i>Gopherus polyphemus</i>) population in south Florida
Author
Karlin, Melissa Lynn
Number of pages
56
Publication year
2005
Degree date
2005
School code
0119
Source
MAI 43/06M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780542137686, 0542137682
Advisor
Moore, Jon
University/institution
Florida Atlantic University
University location
United States -- Florida
Degree
M.S.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1426993
ProQuest document ID
305414957
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305414957
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