Abstract/Details

Development of four novel UWB antennas assisted by FDTD method


2005 2005

Other formats: Order a copy

Abstract (summary)

Due to high demand for wide bandwidth applications, UWB antennas have received significant attention in many commercial and military application areas. They can provide very wide bandwidth information with a single antenna configuration. However, designing UWB antennas have very strict requirement such as broadband matching, broad beamwidth, and good efficiency throughout the operational frequency band which is generally difficult to obtain.

In this work, the finite different time domain (FDTD) method was selected for the design and optimization of UWB antennas in many different application areas. They include ground penetrating radar (GPR), anechoic chamber feed antenna, near field probe antenna and tapered chamber feed. All these antennas require UWB operation, dual linear polarization, and broad beamwidth. For each application area, they have their own detail operation requirements. With the help of the FDTD code and through understanding, the antennas are deeply studied and analyzed for the final design. This process saves time and cost compared to the repeated prototyping. For the verification of the numerical result, prototype antennas are built, measured and compared to its numerical model result. The measurement and the simulations agree due to the realistic modeling of the geometry.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Electrical engineering
Classification
0544: Electrical engineering
Identifier / keyword
Applied sciences; Antennas; Ultrawideband
Title
Development of four novel UWB antennas assisted by FDTD method
Author
Lee, Kwan-Ho
Number of pages
183
Publication year
2005
Degree date
2005
School code
0168
Source
DAI-B 66/01, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780496946235, 0496946234
Advisor
Lee, Robert
University/institution
The Ohio State University
University location
United States -- Ohio
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3160797
ProQuest document ID
305427035
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305427035
Access the complete full text

You can get the full text of this document if it is part of your institution's ProQuest subscription.

Try one of the following:

  • Connect to ProQuest through your library network and search for the document from there.
  • Request the document from your library.
  • Go to the ProQuest login page and enter a ProQuest or My Research username / password.