Abstract/Details

Temperature compensated magnetostriction based fiber Bragg grating current sensor


2005 2005

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Abstract (summary)

A compact and inexpensive optical fiber sensor for the measurement of DC and AC currents is developed. The sensor consists of a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) bonded on two end-to-end joined pieces of metal alloys, one metal alloy being Terfenol-D and the other MONEL 400. Terfenol D has huge magnetostriction, so when a magnetic field is applied stress is created in it and it expands. This property of Terfenol is used as a transducer to convert electrical measurand to mechanical.

A magnetic field applied along the two alloy bars will make the reflection spectrum of the Bragg grating split into two. The distance between the peaks of the reflection spectrum and the total intensity of light reflected back from the grating is directly proportional to the magnetic field applied along the alloys. The resultant split in the spectra can be measured with a simple technique using a single photo-detector. On the other hand, as Terfenol D and MONEL 400 have almost identical thermal expansion coefficients, a change in temperature does not cause the reflected spectra of the grating to move apart and, therefore, does not affect the magnetic field measurement. So the measurements are not affected by temperature.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Electrical engineering
Classification
0544: Electrical engineering
Identifier / keyword
Applied sciences
Title
Temperature compensated magnetostriction based fiber Bragg grating current sensor
Author
Kancheti, Ramesh Babu
Number of pages
62
Publication year
2005
Degree date
2005
School code
0139
Source
MAI 44/05M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780542575792, 0542575795
Advisor
Rawat, Banmali
University/institution
University of Nevada, Reno
University location
United States -- Nevada
Degree
M.S.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1433125
ProQuest document ID
305427854
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305427854
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