Abstract/Details

The effect of omitted cues on alphabet -supplemented intelligibility


2005 2005

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Abstract (summary)

The practice of using alphabet supplementation to increase speech intelligibility for people with dysarthric speech has been documented for that past 25 years. Alphabet supplementation involves pointing to the first letter of each word as it is spoken. Alphabet supplementation can increase sentence-level intelligibility by an average of 26%. Traditional alphabet supplementation research assumes complete and accurate alphabet cues for all spoken words. No documentation exists about the effect of omitted alphabet cues on speech intelligibility.

This study investigated the effect of omitting alphabet cues from alphabet-supplemented speech by systematically omitting the cues for words within different word classes. Specifically, no alphabet cues were omitted in a 100% alphabet supplementation condition, cues for all nouns were omitted in an alphabet-minus-noun condition, cues for functor words were omitted in an alphabet-minus-functors condition, and cues for verbs were omitted in an alphabet-minus verbs condition. The study used sentence stimuli from two different speakers. Each experiment compared sentence intelligibility scores between habitual speech (natural dysarthric speech with no intervention) and the four alphabet-supplemented conditions, and between the 100% supplementation condition and the three omitted conditions.

Results showed statistically significant differences between the habitual speech condition and all but one of the alphabet supplementation conditions. No statistically significant differences occurred between the 100% alphabet supplementation condition and any of the manipulated conditions.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Speech therapy
Classification
0460: Speech therapy
Identifier / keyword
Health and environmental sciences, Alphabet-supplemented, Intelligibility, Omitted cues
Title
The effect of omitted cues on alphabet -supplemented intelligibility
Author
Hanson, Elizabeth K.
Number of pages
66
Publication year
2005
Degree date
2005
School code
0138
Source
DAI-B 66/02, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
0496979531, 9780496979530
Advisor
Beukelman, David R.
University/institution
The University of Nebraska - Lincoln
University location
United States -- Nebraska
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3163989
ProQuest document ID
305454163
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305454163
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