Abstract/Details

Residential choice and locational quality: A discrete -choice modeling approach


2002 2002

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Abstract (summary)

This dissertation employs a discrete-choice model of residential choice for the Metropolitan area of Portland, Oregon, using microdata from the 1994–1995 “Travel Activity and Household Behavior Survey”. Individual and neighborhood characteristics, together with accessibility measures, are used to capture microbehavior regarding residential preferences. Explicit school quality and safety measures are used to reflect neighborhood quality, while life cycle is used to determine changes in demanded levels of locational quality. In addition, this research develops an explicit approach to choice set generation based on travel-time tolerances, and demonstrates how the lift-curve plot can be useful in nonbinary choice models.

The findings of this study indicate that locational quality significantly affects residential choice. In addition, these findings show that modeling microbehavior, using explicit neighborhood quality factors together with the life cycle concept, can improve the explanatory power of conventional residential choice models.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Urban planning;
Area planning & development;
Social research;
Transportation
Classification
0999: Urban planning
0999: Area planning & development
0344: Social research
0709: Transportation
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences; Discrete choice; Locational quality; Oregon; Residential choice
Title
Residential choice and locational quality: A discrete -choice modeling approach
Author
Poulakidas, Dimitris
Number of pages
217
Publication year
2002
Degree date
2002
School code
0175
Source
DAI-A 63/02, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780493578385, 0493578382
Advisor
Smith, Tony E.
University/institution
University of Pennsylvania
University location
United States -- Pennsylvania
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3043941
ProQuest document ID
305517631
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305517631
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