Abstract/Details

Toward a critical ethic: Hobbes, Kant, and Nietzsche on feelings and *foundations


2002 2002

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Abstract (summary)

The texts that play a major role in my dissertation include Hobbes's Leviathan, Kant's Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals and Critique of Practical Reason, and Nietzsche's Beyond Good and Evil and Toward a Genealogy of Morals. My research is situated on the border between ethics and politics because I challenge the belief that ethical conduct always requires universal laws. The articulation of an ethical sensibility that is not grounded on a universal law has been one of the thorniest issues in political theory. Ethical reflection has been unnecessarily trapped between the poles of moral universalism and/or relativism. Through readings of Hobbes, Kant, and Nietzsche in reference to foundations and specific human feelings, I demonstrate that the absence of moral universals does not put an end to ethics but is the condition for a new ethical sensibility that overcomes the this opposition. A critical ethic confronts the difficulty of articulating the relationship between ethics and politics in an age of disenchantment.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Political science;
Philosophy
Classification
0615: Political science
0422: Philosophy
Identifier / keyword
Philosophy, religion and theology; Social sciences; Critical ethic; Feelings; Foundations; Friedrich Nietzsche; Hobbes, Thomas; Immanuel Kant; Kant, Immanuel; Nietzsche, Friedrich; Thomas Hobbes
Title
Toward a critical ethic: Hobbes, Kant, and Nietzsche on feelings and *foundations
Author
Sokoloff, William W.
Number of pages
146
Publication year
2002
Degree date
2002
School code
0118
Source
DAI-A 63/06, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780493717203, 049371720X
Advisor
Xenos, Nicholas
University/institution
University of Massachusetts Amherst
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3056280
ProQuest document ID
305530597
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/305530597
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