Abstract/Details

Disenchanting Japan: Japanese futurity in “Neuromancer” and the science fiction of Masaki Gorō


2010 2010

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Abstract (summary)

I apply enchantment theory to William Gibson's Neuromancer and several works by the Japanese SF author Masaki Gorō to reveal shared assumptions about Japan as the locus of an emergent techno-social hybridity. Both Gibson and Masaki register signs of widespread disenchantment stemming from an increasingly technologically advanced society with a ruthlessly efficient take on capitalism. However, they mobilize their portrayals to different ends. I demonstrate that the authors diverge in their assessments of a technologically-mediated reenchantment. I also argue that the authors' use of conventions from hard-boiled fiction performs several functions. First, it ironically highlights the impossibility of nostalgia in such a future world, where the concept of home is divested of stability. Second, it evinces an anxiety over the transition from individualistic subjectivity to decentered posthumanity. Third, it reinforces the theme of the supplantation of the traditional nation-state by hyper-capitalist forms.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Asian literature;
Asian Studies;
American literature
Classification
0305: Asian literature
0342: Asian Studies
0591: American literature
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences; Language, literature and linguistics; Disenchantment; Futurity; Gibson, W. (William); Goro, Masaki; Neuromancer; Weber, Max
Title
Disenchanting Japan: Japanese futurity in “Neuromancer” and the science fiction of Masaki Gorō
Author
Garza, James Michael
Number of pages
128
Publication year
2010
Degree date
2010
School code
0009
Source
MAI 48/05M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781124007526
Advisor
Gabriel, James P.
Committee member
McVeigh, Brian J.; Pinnington, Noel J.
University/institution
The University of Arizona
Department
East Asian Studies
University location
United States -- Arizona
Degree
M.A.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1476508
ProQuest document ID
497002881
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/497002881
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