Abstract/Details

Experimental injector element stability characterization and combustion imaging


2010 2010

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Abstract (summary)

This research evaluated the stability characteristics of a swirl-coaxial injector in an atmospheric combustion chamber using gaseous oxygen and gaseous methane as the propellants. The experiment studies the mixing processes in a laboratory-scale analogue to full-scale engine operating conditions. The injector was tested over a range of mass flow conditions that matched specified scaling parameters for a notional space engine. The scaling parameters used were mixture ratio, velocity ratio, momentum ratio, and momentum flux ratio. A maximum amplitude of 3.52% of chamber pressure was measured when the injector was placed 19 mm from the chamber wall. The associated instability mode—determined by phase and amplitude analysis from high-frequency pressure measurements—corresponded to a second tangential mode. The scaling parameters that most closely correlated to combustion instability were the design exit velocities and mixture ratio. CH* chemiluminescence emissions were shown to occur in phase with pressure oscillations, and during unstable combustion, the combustion zone appeared to lift off the injector. Fuel annulus resonant frequencies possibly caused repeated flame blowout at lower fuel flow rates.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Aerospace engineering
Classification
0538: Aerospace engineering
Identifier / keyword
Applied sciences
Title
Experimental injector element stability characterization and combustion imaging
Author
Ikard, Robert LaShawn
Number of pages
255
Publication year
2010
Degree date
2010
School code
0278
Source
MAI 48/06M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781124047997
Advisor
Frederick, Robert A., Jr.
University/institution
The University of Alabama in Huntsville
University location
United States -- Alabama
Degree
M.S.E.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1484927
ProQuest document ID
518898108
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/518898108/abstract
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