Abstract/Details

Performance of residential heating and cooling control strategies using distributed wireless sensor networks


2010 2010

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Abstract (summary)

Previous work has suggested that residential space heating and cooling control strategies that partition the structure into individual zones using wireless sensor networks might result in lower energy consumption compared to systems using a single-sensor thermostat. Questions have been posed as to whether these strategies can achieve the same level of performance in a variety of geographic locations and climates. This study compared four control strategies that utilized a wireless temperature and humidity sensor network to regulate the comfort of a residence in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States during the summer and winter. In particular, the energy consumption and comfort levels of each multi-sensor strategy were compared to a baseline strategy that mimicked a single thermostat. The difference in energy usage measured by each control strategy was found to be statistically insignificant. However, experiments indicated that these strategies may nevertheless result in improvements in thermal comfort.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Mechanical engineering
Classification
0548: Mechanical engineering
Identifier / keyword
Applied sciences; Control; Cooling; Energy; Heating; Residential; Wireless
Title
Performance of residential heating and cooling control strategies using distributed wireless sensor networks
Author
Siemann, Michael
Number of pages
152
Publication year
2010
Degree date
2010
School code
0117
Source
MAI 48/06M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781124074498
Advisor
Kim, Jungho; Chopra, Nikhil
Committee member
Hwang, Yunho; Radermacher, Reinhard
University/institution
University of Maryland, College Park
Department
Mechanical Engineering
University location
United States -- Maryland
Degree
M.S.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1478106
ProQuest document ID
621161278
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/621161278
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