Abstract/Details

Training paraprofessionals to implement the picture exchange communication system (PECS)


2010 2010

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Abstract (summary)

Based on Skinner’s Verbal Behavior (1957), the picture exchange communication system (PECS) was designed to teach children with autism functional verbal behavior. Much research has demonstrated the effectiveness and efficiency of PECS in building verbal behavior. However, because PECS training is typically presented in a group format and later discontinued (Howlin et al., 2007), decreases in treatment integrity may result in loss of effectiveness and durability. Hence, more intensive approaches may be necessary to establish, generalize, and maintain PECS delivery skills for educators beyond those demonstrated in workshop or group consultation trainings. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to examine the effects of a feedback model developed by Marcus, Swanson, and Vollmer (2001) to teach paraprofessionals to implement PECS with a high degree of integrity using single subject design methodology. The study examined the performance of paraprofessionals and students, as well as the extension and maintenance of PECs implementation. Implications for PECS training, and PECS training protocol are discussed in establishing and maintaining PECS delivery with integrity.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Educational psychology;
Teacher education
Classification
0525: Educational psychology
0530: Teacher education
Identifier / keyword
Education; Autism; Paraprofessionals; Picture exchange communication system
Title
Training paraprofessionals to implement the picture exchange communication system (PECS)
Author
Sloman, Glenn Matthew
Number of pages
104
Publication year
2010
Degree date
2010
School code
0070
Source
DAI-A 71/08, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781124128603
Advisor
Smith-Bonahue, Tina
University/institution
University of Florida
University location
United States -- Florida
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3416735
ProQuest document ID
743814727
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/743814727
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