Abstract/Details

Low viscosity channels and the stability of long wavelength convection


2010 2010

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Abstract (summary)

Mantle convection simulations with a low viscosity channel, akin to the Earth's asthenosphere, are characterized by long wavelength flow structure. Boundary layer theory predicts that as the viscosity of the channel decreases, the wavelength that maximizes heat transfer increases. As a pattern selection criterion, this analysis is not complete. It provides no mechanism to relate the optimal heat transfer wavelength to the wavelength that is realized or preferred in nature. We present numerical simulation suites, for bottom and internally heated end-members, to demonstrate that the cell wavelengths that maximize heat transfer are also the most stable. This does not rule out the possibility of multiple wavelengths being realizable but it does imply that wavelengths near the stability peak will be preferred and, for the configurations we explore, the stability peak corresponds to the energetically most efficient flow configuration.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Geology;
Geophysics;
Plasma physics
Classification
0372: Geology
0373: Geophysics
0759: Plasma physics
Identifier / keyword
Pure sciences; Earth sciences
Title
Low viscosity channels and the stability of long wavelength convection
Author
Ahmed, Omar Khalil
Number of pages
24
Publication year
2010
Degree date
2010
School code
0187
Source
MAI 49/01M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781124212692
Advisor
Lenardic, Adrian
University/institution
Rice University
University location
United States -- Texas
Degree
M.S.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1486052
ProQuest document ID
751024476
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/751024476
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