Abstract/Details

Development of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) gate dielectrics for TFT applications


2010 2010

Other formats: Order a copy

Abstract (summary)

This study investigated a variety of electrically insulating materials for potential use as a gate dielectric in thin-film transistor applications. The materials that were investigated include silicon dioxide and oxynitride films deposited using PECVD and LPCVD techniques. Silicon source materials included tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) and silane (SiH4). Oxygen sources included diatomic oxygen (O2) and nitrous oxide (N 2O). The optical, electrical, and material properties of the dielectrics were analyzed using Variable Angle Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (VASE), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Capacitance-Voltage (C-V) analysis and current-voltage (I-V) analysis. Transistors were also fabricated at low temperatures with different gate dielectrics to investigate the impact on device performance. While a deposited gate dielectric is intrinsically inferior to a thermally grown SiO2 layer, an objective of this study was to create a high quality gate dielectric with low levels of bulk and interface charge (Qit & Qot∼1x1010 cm 2); this was achieved.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Electrical engineering
Classification
0544: Electrical engineering
Identifier / keyword
Applied sciences; Dielectric; Gate oxide; Low temperature; Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition; Thin film transistors
Title
Development of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) gate dielectrics for TFT applications
Author
Fenger, Germain L.
Number of pages
101
Publication year
2010
Degree date
2010
School code
0465
Source
MAI 49/01M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781124176994
Advisor
Hirschman, Karl D.
Committee member
Jackson, Michael; Raisanen, Alan
University/institution
Rochester Institute of Technology
Department
Microelectronic Engineering
University location
United States -- New York
Degree
M.S.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1480219
ProQuest document ID
751586231
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/751586231
Access the complete full text

You can get the full text of this document if it is part of your institution's ProQuest subscription.

Try one of the following:

  • Connect to ProQuest through your library network and search for the document from there.
  • Request the document from your library.
  • Go to the ProQuest login page and enter a ProQuest or My Research username / password.