Abstract/Details

Psychographic factors and prospective students' use of interactive features on admissions websites of institutes of higher education


2010 2010

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Abstract (summary)

This study assessed the relationship between psychographic factors and the liking and use of interactive features. Prospective and freshman college students were surveyed regarding their activities, interests and opinions, and on their liking and use of interactive features on Websites of Institutes of Higher Education (IHEs). Price consciousness was related to the following: liking of Frequently Asked Questions and blogs; and to the use of tuition cost estimators, instant messaging with current students; and links to student run magazines, and student and alumni success stories. Active users of social media Websites did not differ significantly from non-users in their liking and use of computer-mediated communication features.

Keywords. institute of higher education admissions Websites, interactivity, student recruitment, psychographics, Activities, Interests and Opinions (AIOs).

Indexing (details)


Subject
Marketing;
Communication;
Higher education;
Studies;
Web sites;
Psychology
Classification
0338: Marketing
0459: Communication
0745: Higher education
Identifier / keyword
Communication and the arts; Education; Social sciences; AIOs; Activities; Institute of higher education admissions websites; Interactivity; Interests and opinions; Psychographics; Student recruitment
Title
Psychographic factors and prospective students' use of interactive features on admissions websites of institutes of higher education
Author
Cheong, Nicholas
Number of pages
91
Publication year
2010
Degree date
2010
School code
0465
Source
MAI 49/01M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781124176932
Advisor
Pugliese, Rudy
Committee member
Hair, Neil
University/institution
Rochester Institute of Technology
Department
Communication and Media Technologies
University location
United States -- New York
Degree
M.S.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1480216
ProQuest document ID
755686329
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/755686329
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