Abstract/Details

Rural versus urban: Tennessee health administrators’ strategies on recruitment and retention for allied health professionals


2010 2010

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Abstract (summary)

There is a growing interest in understanding recruitment, retention, and turnover of allied health professionals considering employment trends and workforce mobility, an increased need to understand the healthcare delivery system, and the dynamic nature of the allied health workforce especially for rural areas. A survey was sent to allied health administrators across a variety of allied health disciplines from the state of Tennessee hospitals in order to gauge opinions on retention and recruitment strategies. Overall successful strategies for recruitment and retention of allied health professionals were reported as well as differences between urban and rural areas, differences among allied health disciplines perceptions of strategy effectiveness, and key strategies for rural allied health recruitment.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Business administration;
Health sciences;
Health care management;
Studies;
Medical personnel;
Recruitment;
Retention
Classification
0310: Business administration
0566: Health sciences
0769: Health care management
Identifier / keyword
Health and environmental sciences; Social sciences
Title
Rural versus urban: Tennessee health administrators’ strategies on recruitment and retention for allied health professionals
Author
Slagle, Derek Ray
Number of pages
163
Publication year
2010
Degree date
2010
School code
0069
Source
MAI 49/01M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781124236018
Advisor
Byington, Randy
University/institution
East Tennessee State University
University location
United States -- Tennessee
Degree
M.S.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1486238
ProQuest document ID
755736871
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/755736871
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