Abstract/Details

Breastfeeding support explored through mixed methods: How support groups can function as an effective health intervention


2010 2010

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Abstract (summary)

Breastfeeding is an important health issue in the United States, and improving initiation and duration of breastfeeding are part of the Healthy People 2010 goals. However, support is needed by many women to breastfeed successfully. The current study utilizes an exploratory mixed methods design to explore women's experiences with social support and infant feeding methods. In particular, support group participation is examined as a potential contributor to women's breastfeeding success. Participant observation of two breastfeeding support groups and in-depth interviews with 23 participants were conducted for the first phase of the study. This was followed by a survey of women with children under the age of six about their social support resources and experiences feeding their infants. Results show that support group participants breastfeed for significantly longer as a result of their participation in the groups and receive a variety of different types of support in groups. Members also report benefiting from the opportunity to provide support to other mothers and from the chance to share their narratives of their experiences breastfeeding. This paper concludes by discussing the ways in which this study expands our understanding of communal coping, support groups, and health and illness narratives.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Social psychology;
Womens studies;
Communication;
Public health
Classification
0451: Social psychology
0453: Womens studies
0459: Communication
0573: Public health
Identifier / keyword
Health and environmental sciences; Communication and the arts; Social sciences; Psychology; Breastfeeding; Health communication; Narrative; Social support; Support groups
Title
Breastfeeding support explored through mixed methods: How support groups can function as an effective health intervention
Author
Cripe, Emily T.
Number of pages
147
Publication year
2010
Degree date
2010
School code
0010
Source
DAI-A 71/11, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781124261379
Advisor
Palazzolo, Kellie
University/institution
Arizona State University
University location
United States -- Arizona
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3425718
ProQuest document ID
759076014
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/759076014
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