Abstract/Details

The use of breathing retraining among individuals who fear anxiety-related body sensations: Safety behavior or coping aid?


2010 2010

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Abstract (summary)

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for panic disorder consists of multiple treatment components. Although multicomponent CBT for panic disorder is effective, cognitive behavioral theorists have suggested that one treatment component, breathing retraining, might function as a safety behavior. Safety behaviors are acts aimed at preventing or minimizing feared catastrophe and are thought to maintain pathologic anxiety. An opposing position is that breathing retraining has no detrimental effect on core cognitive processes and may be an effective coping aid. Despite theoretical concern, there has not been an empirical assessment of the effects of breathing retraining on the cognitive processes thought to be involved in the development and maintenance of panic disorder (e.g., catastrophic beliefs, attention toward threat). This study examined the hypothesis that breathing retraining inhibits correction of important cognitive processes when taught within the context of cognitive behavioral psychoeducation. Individuals high in anxiety sensitivity were randomly assigned to a psychoeducation control condition or a psychoeducation plus breathing retraining condition. Results revealed that the addition of breathing retraining did not (a) detract from the gains observed among the control condition on measures of cognitive processes or (b) add to the gains observed among the control condition on measures of coping. The findings are evaluated in light of the available literature regarding breathing retraining and theories of safety behavior.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Clinical psychology;
Cognitive psychology
Classification
0622: Clinical psychology
0633: Cognitive psychology
Identifier / keyword
Psychology; Anxiety sensitivity; Breathing retraining; CBT; Cognitive behavioral therapy; Diaphragmatic breathing; Panic disorder
Title
The use of breathing retraining among individuals who fear anxiety-related body sensations: Safety behavior or coping aid?
Author
Lickel, James J.
Number of pages
65
Publication year
2010
Degree date
2010
School code
0264
Source
DAI-B 71/11, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781124293370
Advisor
Deacon, Brett J.
Committee member
Gray, Matthew J.; McKibbin, Christine L.; Scott, Walter D.; Sherline, Edward D.
University/institution
University of Wyoming
Department
Psychology
University location
United States -- Wyoming
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3426915
ProQuest document ID
763606644
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/763606644
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