Abstract/Details

Emotional recognition memory for younger and older adults: Combining ROC analysis and the diffusion model


2010 2010

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Abstract (summary)

Three experiments investigated the effect of emotional stimuli on recognition accuracy and response bias for younger and older adults using ROC analysis and Ratcliff's (1978) diffusion model. Theoretically, emotion may enhance memory accuracy either by improving encoding processes or by altering the memory consolidation process. These competing hypotheses were evaluated in a recognition experiment that tested memory both before (immediate testing) and after (20 minute delay) the consolidation process would likely be completed. The emotion-specific consolidation hypothesis was not supported: there was no interaction of emotional-valence with test delay. Because previous research has shown that negatively-valenced items consistently lead to more liberal responding for both older and younger adults, and inconsistently affect memory accuracy (Kapucu, Rotello, Ready, & Seidl, 2008), confidence ratings and reaction time data were assessed. These data were modeled with signal-detection and diffusion approaches that allow independent measurement of memory accuracy and response bias effects. Although the two methods did not converge for all subjects, in general negative words led to large shifts in response bias and increased recognition accuracy for both younger and older adults.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Cognitive psychology
Classification
0633: Cognitive psychology
Identifier / keyword
Psychology; Aging; Diffusion model; Emotion; Recognition memory; Signal detection
Title
Emotional recognition memory for younger and older adults: Combining ROC analysis and the diffusion model
Author
Kapucu, Aycan
Number of pages
96
Publication year
2010
Degree date
2010
School code
0118
Source
DAI-B 71/12, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781124320014
Advisor
Rotello, Caren M.
Committee member
Dasgupta, Nilanjana; Fisher, Donald L.; Macmillan, Neil A.; Staub, Adrian
University/institution
University of Massachusetts Amherst
Department
Psychology
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3427542
ProQuest document ID
814814317
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/814814317
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