Abstract/Details

Applying change detection to test the noticeability of componants of medical labels


2010 2010

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Abstract (summary)

Perception is an active, computationally demanding process that requires cognition as well as perception and attention involves looking at specific features of the environment in a more detailed and focused manner. Inattentional blindness occurs when a stimulus that is not attended is not perceived, even though a person is looking directly at it. Given the documented prevalence of medication error and the criticality of the information contained on the labeling that accompanies medication, research was conducted using change detection to measure the ability of TALL Man lettering to garner attention in labels.

Two populations were targeted for this study, those who were employed as healthcare professionals and those who were not. There was a significant interaction between graphic presentation (TALL Man vs traditional) and profession (P=0.0243). Time to change detection was decreased for all professions when the change was presented in a TALL Man presentation as compared to the traditional text. However, the magnitude of this difference and its significance was greatest for nurses (P<0.0001). A main effect of ordered group was evident on time to detect the change (P<0.0001), a significant positional effect of change was detected on time to detect the (P < 0.0001), and there was marginal evidence (P=0.0821) for a difference between word pairs when the dependent variable was time to change detection.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Packaging
Classification
0549: Packaging
Identifier / keyword
Applied sciences
Title
Applying change detection to test the noticeability of componants of medical labels
Author
DeHenau, Carly Jean
Number of pages
74
Publication year
2010
Degree date
2010
School code
0128
Source
MAI 49/02M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781124334950
Advisor
Bix, Laura
University/institution
Michigan State University
University location
United States -- Michigan
Degree
M.S.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1487212
ProQuest document ID
815405619
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/815405619
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