Abstract/Details

Threat on the mind: The impact of incidental fear on race bias in rapid decision-making


2010 2010

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Abstract (summary)

Theories of emotion and intergroup relations predict a link between fear, outgroup perception, and behavioral intentions toward specific groups. However, surprisingly, past research has not empirically tested the impact of actually experiencing incidental fear on appraisals of in- and outgroups and socially impactful decision-making. Accordingly, the goals of this dissertation were three-fold: (1) to determine whether the experience of incidental fear increases biased decision-making targeted at racial outgroup vs. ingroup members; (2) to investigate whether some individuals are more impacted by fear than others; and (3) to explore the psychological mechanism underlying the biasing impact of fear. In Study 1, fear increased race biased decision-making for female (but not male) participants, and for those who chronically believe the world is a dangerous place. In Study 2, fear shunted attention selectively towards Black over White faces for female (but not male) participants; however, it did not produce race biased decision-making. In Study 3, fear did not modulate attention to danger-relevant stimuli or intergroup decision-making. The implications of these findings and future research directions are discussed.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Social psychology;
Ethnic studies
Classification
0451: Social psychology
0631: Ethnic studies
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences; Psychology; Fear; Intergroup relations; Race bias; Rapid decision-making; Stereotyping
Title
Threat on the mind: The impact of incidental fear on race bias in rapid decision-making
Author
Hunsinger, Matthew
Number of pages
121
Publication year
2010
Degree date
2010
School code
0118
Source
DAI-B 72/01, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781124319964
Advisor
Dasgupta, Nilanjana
Committee member
Isbell, Linda; Sanders, Lisa; Shabazz, Demetria
University/institution
University of Massachusetts Amherst
Department
Psychology
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3427537
ProQuest document ID
816503244
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/816503244
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