Abstract/Details

The effects of anthropogenic noise and human activities on ungulate behavior


2010 2010

Other formats: Order a copy

Abstract (summary)

The effect of anthropogenic noise on terrestrial wildlife is a relatively new area of study with broad ranging management implications. Human activities may increase noise in protected areas, including U.S. National Parks. Grand Teton National Park (GTNP) draws nearly 4 million visitors a year to recreate on park roads, trails, and campgrounds. As visitors travel through the park and congregate around wildlife viewing locations, noise is one of the many disturbance stimuli introduced into the environment. This study investigated the potential impacts of human induced noise and human activities on the behavior of elk (Cervus elaphus) and pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) along a transportation corridor in GTNP. We conducted roadside scan surveys and focal observations of ungulate behavior while concurrently recording human activity and anthropogenic noise. Ungulates were less responsive (less likely to perform vigilant, flight and defensive behaviors) in noisy environments when more vehicles were passing and more responsive when pedestrians were present. These effects of noise on responsive behavior may have both positive and negative implications for wildlife conservation and management.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Wildlife Conservation;
Ecology
Classification
0284: Wildlife Conservation
0329: Ecology
Identifier / keyword
Biological sciences; Acoustic; Behavior; Conservation; Noise; Road; Ungulate
Title
The effects of anthropogenic noise and human activities on ungulate behavior
Author
Brown, Casey L.
Number of pages
37
Publication year
2010
Degree date
2010
School code
0053
Source
MAI 49/03M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781124396408
Advisor
Angeloni, Lisa M.; Crooks, Kevin R.
Committee member
Fristrup, Kurt M.
University/institution
Colorado State University
Department
Ecology (Graduate Degree Program)
University location
United States -- Colorado
Degree
M.S.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1483907
ProQuest document ID
845226396
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/845226396
Access the complete full text

You can get the full text of this document if it is part of your institution's ProQuest subscription.

Try one of the following:

  • Connect to ProQuest through your library network and search for the document from there.
  • Request the document from your library.
  • Go to the ProQuest login page and enter a ProQuest or My Research username / password.