Abstract/Details

The Puritans' note rote controversy The beginning of music education in colonial America


2010 2010

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Abstract (summary)

This thesis substantiates a link between two branches of humanities – music and religion. By providing historical and cultural context, it debunks many commonly held misconceptions regarding the Puritans. Extensive research of original documents reveals that it was Puritan ministers in Boston who established the first formal music education in the colonies. The Note Rote Controversy which was raging within the church in the 1720s incited many Puritan ministers to preach and write in favor of note reading. As a result of the efforts of these ministers, the first singing schools began in Boston in the early 1720s and soon spread throughout the colonies. These early schools were the predecessors of Mason's famed Boston singing schools of the 1830s.

This thesis proves the contributions of Puritans to music education in America, while exposing their (often humorous) foibles. The conclusion draws comparisons between the Note Rote controversy and the modern day "Worship Wars."

Indexing (details)


Subject
Religious history;
American history;
Music education
Classification
0320: Religious history
0337: American history
0522: Music education
Identifier / keyword
Philosophy, religion and theology; Education; Social sciences
Title
The Puritans' note rote controversy The beginning of music education in colonial America
Author
Siemer, Debbie Ann
Number of pages
133
Publication year
2010
Degree date
2010
School code
0582
Source
MAI 49/04M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781124518633
Advisor
Shannon, Jacqueline
University/institution
California State University, Dominguez Hills
University location
United States -- California
Degree
M.A.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1490122
ProQuest document ID
858414921
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/858414921
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