Abstract/Details

Implementing Participative Management to Reform and Improve Federal Government Civil Service Functionality and Break Bureaucratic Stagnation


2010 2010

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Abstract (summary)

Bureaucracy was originally created as an organizational form that was said to have the greatest advantages in its ability to create efficient running organizations with strict rules and controls. Because governments were viewed as process organizations and not production organizations, most government agencies readily adopted the bureaucratic structure. Unfortunately over time, many problems became apparent with bureaucracies, including stagnation, a lack of functionality, and a dysfunctional culture. These problems have led to public dissatisfaction in government and have caused agencies to fail in their missions and goals. In order for government agencies to function properly, improve efficiency, break stagnation, and to have a service-oriented culture changes are required in hierarchy and management. Participative management is proposed as a way to reform bureaucracy and to address the main identified issues that plague bureaucracy, because it allows stakeholders of the agency to participate in decision-making and reform. This document explores the problems with bureaucracy and defines how participative management should be used to reform and reinvigorate government agencies.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Management;
Studies;
Civil service;
Reforms;
Bureaucracy
Classification
0454: Management
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences
Title
Implementing Participative Management to Reform and Improve Federal Government Civil Service Functionality and Break Bureaucratic Stagnation
Author
Benion, De Juhn
Number of pages
34
Publication year
2010
Degree date
2010
School code
1637
Source
MAI 49/05M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781124585284
Advisor
Hughes, Laurel
University/institution
Aspen University
University location
United States -- Colorado
Degree
M.B.A.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1492922
ProQuest document ID
863849102
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/863849102
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