Abstract/Details

Estimating incidence of multiple paternity of Kemp's ridley sea turtles on South Padre Island, Texas


2011 2011

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Abstract (summary)

Little is known about the genetic mating system of the Kemp’s ridley sea turtle, Lepidochelys kempii. Jensen et al. (2006) found a positive relationship between the incidence of multiple paternity (MP) and the estimated population size of rookeries. In the high density Kemp’s ridley Rancho Nuevo rookery, Kichler et al. (1999) estimated 81% of nests were multiply sired (Wang 2004). If MP is positively related to nesting female density, then MP in Kemp’s ridley should be lower on a low-density nesting beach on South Padre Island, Texas (SPI) than in a Mexico’s much larger nesting population. We genotyped 154 hatchling tissue samples from nests on SPI at 14 microsatellite loci. Results using full sibship reconstruction as implemented in COLONY indicated that 52% of nests with two or more samples (11 of 21) exhibited MP. This suggests that this species does not follow the female density trend proposed by Jensen et al. (2006) and maintains high levels of MP and genetic variation across its nesting range.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Wildlife Conservation;
Genetics;
Conservation
Classification
0284: Wildlife Conservation
0369: Genetics
0408: Conservation
Identifier / keyword
Biological sciences; Breeding biology; Conservation genetics; Kemp's ridley sea turtles; Multiple paternity; Sea turtle
Title
Estimating incidence of multiple paternity of Kemp's ridley sea turtles on South Padre Island, Texas
Author
Frankel, Anna Margaret Dalby
Number of pages
31
Publication year
2011
Degree date
2011
School code
0229
Source
MAI 49/05M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781124597843
Advisor
Williams, Dean
Committee member
Hale, Amanda; Horner, John
University/institution
Texas Christian University
Department
College of Science and Engineering
University location
United States -- Texas
Degree
M.S.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1491331
ProQuest document ID
865010281
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/865010281
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