Abstract/Details

Is legible space peaceful space? Bureaucratic order and civil war onset


2011 2011

Other formats: Order a copy

Abstract (summary)

Armed conflict in the post-Cold War world has taken place overwhelmingly at the intra-state level. The precipitous decline in instances of war between states has led some scholars to posit a prolonged era of international peace. This internalization of conflict has resulted in a new interest in counterinsurgency and state-building operations, in both academic and policy circles, as states seek to consolidate sovereign control over their territory and population. The rise of an intellectual soldier class in the United States, led by David Petreaus, John Nagl and others, is emblematic of this trend. This paper examines the causes of civil war, the dominant form of armed conflict since 1990 and the ultimate proof of unrealized state sovereignty. Controlling for traditional explanatory variables for civil war, such as economic prosperity, regime type, ethnic fractionalization and access to state power, it evaluates the causal effects of legibility on civil war onset. I conceive of legibility in a manner similar to James C. Scott in his seminal work, Seeing like a State. Scott asserts that modern state have sought above all to create order out of apparent chaos by imposing centralized, bureaucratic order on dynamic, peripheral space. He argues that these efforts are doomed to fail because the center is unable to capture social complexity on the periphery. Using binomial logit and ordinary least squares regressions, this paper demonstrates that legibility, while imperfect, may mitigate the threat of civil war.

Indexing (details)


Subject
International Relations;
Public policy
Classification
0601: International Relations
0630: Public policy
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences; Civil war; Counterinsurgency theory; Legibility; Logit regression; State penetration; Theory of the state
Title
Is legible space peaceful space? Bureaucratic order and civil war onset
Author
White, Christopher E.
Number of pages
45
Publication year
2011
Degree date
2011
School code
0076
Source
MAI 49/05M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781124603308
Advisor
Fleming, Matthew H.
University/institution
Georgetown University
Department
Public Policy & Policy Management
University location
United States -- District of Columbia
Degree
M.P.P.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1491593
ProQuest document ID
865286120
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/865286120
Access the complete full text

You can get the full text of this document if it is part of your institution's ProQuest subscription.

Try one of the following:

  • Connect to ProQuest through your library network and search for the document from there.
  • Request the document from your library.
  • Go to the ProQuest login page and enter a ProQuest or My Research username / password.