Abstract/Details

Lament in Romans: Promise, suffering, and the cry of distress


2011 2011

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Abstract (summary)

This dissertation examines Paul’s understanding of suffering in Romans by analyzing the OT lament language that he often cites, alludes to, and echoes. Chapter 1 introduces the history of interpretation, thesis, and aim of the dissertation.

Chapter 2 summarizes the OT lament language that Paul employs in Romans. Specifically, this chapter examines the form and function of lament language in various parts of the OT.

Chapter 3 examines Paul’s use of lament language in Romans 3:10–18. There is analysis of both the form and function of the language. The chapter considers how recognition of lament language in this portion of the letter impacts interpretation of the immediate context and the overall understanding of suffering in Romans.

Chapter 4 addresses the use of OT lament language in Romans 7:7–25. There is an analysis of both the form and function of the language. The chapter considers how the recognition of lament language in this portion of the letter impacts the interpretation of the immediate context and the overall understanding of suffering in Romans. Additionally, there is a discussion regarding the preference for an OT background to Romans 7:7–25 rather than a Greco-Roman one.

Chapter 5 examines the use of a lament language in Romans 8:18–39. It considers how Paul portrays the sons of God, creation, and the Holy Spirit as lamenters. Moreover, it looks at the impact of the citation from Psalm 44, a lament psalm, on the overall meaning of Romans 8:31–39. There is also a consideration of how the lament language in Romans 8:18–39 informs one’s understanding of suffering in Romans.

Chapter 6 looks at use of lament language in Romans 9–11. Special attention is given to the echo of Moses’ intercessory lament in Romans 9:1–5. The chapter considers how Romans 9:6–11:36 contains an answer to Paul’s intercessory lament. The findings are then brought to bear on the issue of suffering in Romans.

Chapter 7 is the conclusion to the work that summarizes the thesis and brings the weight of that thesis to bear on two issues germane to Pauline Studies. Specifically, Wright’s narrative reading of Romans is challenged, and Stendahl’s reading of Romans 7 is questioned. Finally, the chapter proposes a Sitz im Leben for Romans in light of the pervasive use of lament language in the letter.

The main thesis of this work is that Paul’s use of lament language in Romans simultaneously points to the depth of the suffering he addresses and the power of the gospel he preaches. By recognizing this language, one gains a better appreciation for the suffering of Paul and the Christians in Rome, as well as the hope they had in the midst of such profound pain.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Biblical studies;
Pastoral Counseling;
Theology
Classification
0321: Biblical studies
0397: Pastoral Counseling
0469: Theology
Identifier / keyword
Philosophy, religion and theology; Lament; NT use of OT; New perspective on Paul; Psalms of lament; Romans (Letter to the); Suffering
Title
Lament in Romans: Promise, suffering, and the cry of distress
Author
Crisler, Channing Leon
Number of pages
209
Publication year
2011
Degree date
2011
School code
0207
Source
DAI-A 72/07, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781124630342
Advisor
Seifrid, Mark A.
Committee member
Brand, Chad O.; Garrett, Duane A.
University/institution
The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary
Department
School of Theology
University location
United States -- Kentucky
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3454184
ProQuest document ID
868502696
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/868502696
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