Abstract/Details

Shrink Enhanced Photolithography: Substrates for Biomedical Applications


2011 2011

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Abstract (summary)

Photolithography is inherently limited in resolution by diffraction of light around the edges of the features on the mask. In an effort to overcome this limitation inexpensively, patterns are created onto shrink polymer and after thermal treatment the features are substantially reduced in size, thus beating the inherent optical resolution of ‘top-down’ processing. In addition to demonstrating the compatibility of this process with photolithography, photoresist was used as an etch mask to create microstructures directly in the plastic sheets. Using a double-shrink process, a mask was created out of the children's toy Shrinky-Dinks by simply printing dots using a standard desktop printer. Retraction of this pre-stressed thermoplastic sheet causes the printed dots to shrink to a fraction of their original size. Then the patterns are lithographically transferred onto negative photoresist-coated commodity shrink-wrap film for a total reduction in size of almost 99%. These microwells are then used to mold polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to create a super-hydrophobic surface with nano structures, presenting contact angles of > 150°. Finally, to demonstrate the customizability of this approach, microfluidic channels were patterned (areas of relative hydrophilicity) such that open microfluidic channels are achieved, in which the fluid only wicks in certain regions.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Biomedical engineering
Classification
0541: Biomedical engineering
Identifier / keyword
Applied sciences; Microfabrication; Photolithography on plastic substrates; Polystyrene mask; Roughened microwells; Shrink polymer; Superhydrophobic surfaces
Title
Shrink Enhanced Photolithography: Substrates for Biomedical Applications
Author
Jayadev, Shreshta
Number of pages
36
Publication year
2011
Degree date
2011
School code
0030
Source
MAI 49/06M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781124677491
Advisor
Khine, Michelle
Committee member
Hui, Elliot; Tang, William C.
University/institution
University of California, Irvine
Department
Biomedical Engineering - M.S.
University location
United States -- California
Degree
M.S.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1493991
ProQuest document ID
874289417
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/874289417
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