Abstract/Details

New Frontiers in Population Recording


2011 2011

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Abstract (summary)

The advent of reliable simultaneous recording of the activity of many neurons has enabled the study of interactions between neurons at a large scale: the number of observed pairwise interactions is proportional to the square of the number of recorded neurons. The dominant phenomenon in these pairwise interactions is synchronization, reflecting a system where many observed variables have in common a smaller set of latent variables. This permits the possibility that the complex signals observed in the brain might be reducible to a simpler system. We used this insight to design a better signal processing scheme for neuroprosthetics; to identify the same neurons in many recording sessions from their pairwise interactions; to show that the tuning functions of neurons in motor and premotor cortex do not reflect simple coordinate frame models; and to identify error as a dominant signal during continuous movements.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Neurosciences
Classification
0317: Neurosciences
Identifier / keyword
Biological sciences; Latent variables; Motor cortex; Movement; Neurons; Population recording
Title
New Frontiers in Population Recording
Author
Fraser, George Williams
Number of pages
146
Publication year
2011
Degree date
2011
School code
0178
Source
DAI-B 72/11, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781124833460
Advisor
Schwartz, Andrew
University/institution
University of Pittsburgh
University location
United States -- Pennsylvania
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3471950
ProQuest document ID
888180641
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/888180641
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