Abstract/Details

Radar remote sensing of currents and waves in the nearshore zone


2008 2008

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Abstract (summary)

The relationship between microwave radar and optical video imaging of the nearshore region is studied. The remotely sensed data were used to estimate the longshore currents and the surf zone width.

Doppler radar relies on small scale surface roughness that scatters the incident electromagnetic radiation so that velocities are obtained from the Doppler shift of the backscattered radiation. Video relies on texture and contrast of scattered sunlight from the sea surface, and velocity estimates are determined using Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV). This study compares video PIV-derived and Doppler radar surface velocities over a 1 km alongshore by 0.5 km cross-shore area in the surf zone of a natural beach. The two surface velocity estimates are strongly correlated (R2 ≥ 0:79) over much of the surf zone. Estimates differ at the outer edge of the surf where strong breaking is prevalent, with radar estimated velocities as much as 50% below the video estimates. Both systems observe a strong eddy-like mean flow pattern over 200 m section of coastline with the mean alongshore current changing direction at about the mid surf zone. The radar and PIV velocities at particular locations in the surf zone track each other well over a 6 hour period, showing strong modulations in the mean alongshore flow occurring on 10-20 minute time intervals.

The offshore region in the absence of sufficiently strong wind is sometimes barely visible, while the surf zone always appears very bright in radar backscatter images due to persistent surface roughness produced by breaking waves. The backscatter and coherence radar images were used in conjunction with edge detection filters to estimate the surf zone width from radar data. The surf zone width from video data is calculated using the time-stacking techniques. The comparison of surf zone width over 6 hours showed the rms difference of 8.8 m close to the radar location while the radar had the tendency to overestimate the distance for most of the run. The correlation of two measurements was high at 0.89. At locations farther than 600 m away from the radar the surf zone width rms differences were higher, up to 24 m, while correlation remained high. The differences are attributed to the estimate of the shoreline in radar images due to different scattering properties of wet and dry sand.

The good spatial and temporal agreement between the two remote measurement techniques which rely on very different mechanisms, suggests that both are reasonably approximating the nearshore processes.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Oceanography;
Electrical engineering;
Remote sensing
Classification
0415: Oceanography
0544: Electrical engineering
0799: Remote sensing
Identifier / keyword
Applied sciences, Earth sciences, Currents, Doppler radar, Longshore currents, Nearshore zone, Particle image velocimetry, Waves
Title
Radar remote sensing of currents and waves in the nearshore zone
Author
Perkovic, Dragana
Number of pages
124
Publication year
2008
Degree date
2008
School code
0118
Source
DAI-B 69/07, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549730644
Advisor
Frasier, Stephen J.
Committee member
Bobba, Kumar; Lippmann, Thomas C.; Siqueira, Paul R.; Swift, Calvin T.
University/institution
University of Massachusetts Amherst
Department
Electrical & Computer Engineering
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3322189
ProQuest document ID
89268334
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/89268334
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