Abstract/Details

African American male college students' attitudes toward teaching as a profession


2011 2011

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Abstract (summary)

African American males compose less than 2% of the teacher workforce within the United States of America. The primary focus of this study was to examine the attitudes of African American male college students' attitudes toward considering teaching as a profession by looking at seven dimensions: (1) formative educational experiences/schooling, (2) access into college, (3) family background/parental influence, (4) mentoring and academic support, (5) perception of the importance of the teaching profession, (6) career options, and (7) future plans. Semi-structured interview protocol questions were developed based on the research literature that addressed these seven dimensions for African American students. Eleven African American male college students were interviewed. The results of the study revealed that academic success, teachers' role in their lives, college access and recruitment, perseverance, strong support system, and spirituality were factors that contributed to African American males' college access and college retention. The results of the study also demonstrated that African American males who are in college chose professions other than teaching because there is lack of interest in the teaching field; career choices are selected from perceived salary attainment; career paths are not established while in school; teaching is not seen as an avenue to social mobility and, there is lack of respect by others for the teaching profession.

Indexing (details)


Subject
African American Studies;
Black studies;
Teacher education
Classification
0296: African American Studies
0325: Black studies
0530: Teacher education
Identifier / keyword
Education; Social sciences; Attitudes toward teaching; Black teachers; Career choice; Men; Teacher shortage
Title
African American male college students' attitudes toward teaching as a profession
Author
Wright, Lizette M.
Number of pages
130
Publication year
2011
Degree date
2011
School code
1395
Source
DAI-A 72/12, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781124905129
Advisor
Tatum, Stephanie
University/institution
Dowling College
University location
United States -- New York
Degree
Ed.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3476666
ProQuest document ID
894124490
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/894124490
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