Abstract/Details

Home, school, and community factors that contribute to the educational resilience of urban, African American high school graduates from low-income, single-parent families


2011 2011

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Abstract (summary)

The purpose of this qualitative research study was to explore the ways in which the family, school, and community environments contribute to the academic success of urban, African American high school graduates from low-income, single-parent families. During a three-month period, in-depth individual and focus group interviews were conducted with eight African American high school graduates who excelled academically despite adversity. The student participants were also asked to identify at least one person in their lives who were considered important sources of support. Of the eight social support providers identified, four participated in separate individual interviews focusing on the form of support provided to student participants. The perspectives of student participants on how they overcame adversity and achieved academic success are essential for identifying and understanding the support structures that facilitate academic achievement. Ideally, the results of this study may inform the development of interventions, programs, and counseling practices focused on creating and enhancing the personal and environmental attributes that promote achievement outcomes for other youth in high risk environments (Fraser, 2004; Wang & Gordon, 1994). At the same time, this qualitative research study aimed to counter the trend towards negative portrayals of urban African American youth.

Findings from the present study revealed that protective factors across multiple contexts of students' lives contributed to their academic success despite adversity. Eight themes emerged from participants responses: education specific parenting practices, non-traditional ways of supporting education, maintained kinship networks, school as an agent of families, resilience promoting features of schools, supportive relational networks within the community, promoting ecological resilience to improve student outcomes, and relational strategies to promote educational resilience. Recommendations for practical applications and future research are included.

Indexing (details)


Subject
African American Studies;
Black studies;
School counseling;
Educational psychology
Classification
0296: African American Studies
0325: Black studies
0519: School counseling
0525: Educational psychology
Identifier / keyword
Education; Social sciences; African-American; Counseling; Ecological; Education; Resilience; Single-parent; Youth
Title
Home, school, and community factors that contribute to the educational resilience of urban, African American high school graduates from low-income, single-parent families
Author
Williams, Joseph Michael
Number of pages
160
Publication year
2011
Degree date
2011
School code
0096
Source
DAI-A 72/12, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781124874166
Advisor
Portman, Tarrell Awe Agahe
Committee member
Duys, David K.; Ehly, Stewart W.; Saunders, Jeanne A.; Wood, Susannah M.
University/institution
The University of Iowa
Department
Counseling, Rehabilitation and Student Development
University location
United States -- Iowa
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3473258
ProQuest document ID
894734064
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/894734064
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