Abstract/Details

Grassroots Cosmopolitanism: Transnational Communication and Citizenship Practices among Indigenous Mexican Immigrants in the United States


2011 2011

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Abstract (summary)

This dissertation explains "citizenship" as a practice and a tradition, rather than as a concept describing exclusive belonging to a political community. Immigration is commonly a condition of exclusion from citizenship in our contemporary world, as gender and slavery, have been in the past. Usually, immigrants have to comply with a subtractive model of citizenship and forgo their attachments to their homeland and mother language in order to be part of the new, dominant culture. This model is not smooth, and almost always entails hegemonic, or even violent practices of control from the state institutions either against the first, second, or even third generation. It is precisely from the point of view of immigrants that this exclusivity is challenged, and this work focuses on transnational citizenship and communication practices of indigenous Mexican immigrants in the United States as examples for the construction of a more cosmopolitan citizenship. Those practices offer a good example of how cosmopolitan engagement across nations is constructed from below, enriching instead of limiting the conception of citizenship. Using historical research, ethnography, and content analysis, I examine how transnational citizenship and communication practices among indigenous Mexicans living in California and organizing across borders, are transforming into cosmopolitan citizenship, engaging at least two nation-states along with international organizations into their daily lives. I study the case of one pan-ethnic and multi-site organization primarily composed of indigenous Mexicans from the state of Oaxaca named Indigenous Front of Binational Organizations (FIOB). A content analysis of two indigenous immigrant media is also included, reflecting this cosmopolitan engagement.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Communication;
International Relations;
Hispanic American studies;
Native American studies
Classification
0459: Communication
0601: International Relations
0737: Hispanic American studies
0740: Native American studies
Identifier / keyword
Communication and the arts; Social sciences; Citizenship; Cosmopolitanism; Immigration; Indigenous; Mexican; Mexico; Transnationalism
Title
Grassroots Cosmopolitanism: Transnational Communication and Citizenship Practices among Indigenous Mexican Immigrants in the United States
Author
Mercado, Antonieta
Number of pages
496
Publication year
2011
Degree date
2011
School code
0033
Source
DAI-A 73/01, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781124922225
Advisor
Hallin, Daniel
Committee member
Fitzgerald, David; Horwitz, Robert; Rona-Tas, Akos; Vasquez, Olga; Zilberg, Elana
University/institution
University of California, San Diego
Department
Communication
University location
United States -- California
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3474972
ProQuest document ID
899268901
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/899268901
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