Abstract/Details

Culturally Sensitive Document Design for an Eastern Asia Audience: Comprehension and Preference


2011 2011

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Abstract (summary)

An investigation into Eastern Asia audiences in China, Japan, and Korea determined how intercultural communication affects non-native readers' comprehension and perception of a document design. The study, an after-only experiment, used a small-sized sample from people who were In-Country Reviewers (ICRs) and knew of medical products in Eastern Asia and had knowledge in the area's local language. The subjects read an indigenously or non-indigenously designed document, and self-reported their comprehension and preferences for formatting style. Although the statistics showed no significant difference between the groups, on any variable tested (language, comprehension, and format), the qualitative data that were gathered can be interpreted as Chinese, Japanese, and Korean cultures preferred to read technical documents formatted horizontally and left to right.

Keywords: culture, document design, international communication, intercultural communication, preference.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Communication
Classification
0459: Communication
Identifier / keyword
Communication and the arts; Culture; Document design; Intercultural communication; International communication; Preference
Title
Culturally Sensitive Document Design for an Eastern Asia Audience: Comprehension and Preference
Author
Smith, Merridith
Number of pages
66
Publication year
2011
Degree date
2011
School code
0465
Source
MAI 50/03M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781124987897
Advisor
Austin, Bruce A.
Committee member
Maru, Yukiko; Pugliese, Rudy; Scanlon, Patrick M.
University/institution
Rochester Institute of Technology
Department
Communication and Media Technologies
University location
United States -- New York
Degree
M.F.A.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1501461
ProQuest document ID
905289358
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/905289358
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