Abstract/Details

Conflicts in race and resources: The Tidelands oil controversy in Louisiana, 1950–1965


2010 2010

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Abstract (summary)

Traditional civil rights historiography focuses on the struggles of individuals and organizations resisting segregation measures implemented by Southern states. By identifying alternative motivations for the adherence to segregation among Southern politicians, historians may better understand the social and economical factors that contributed to the Civil Rights era.

Leading up to the adjudication of United States v. Louisiana in 1960, the submerged lands underneath the Gulf of Mexico gave political leaders in Louisiana a financial interest in maintaining and promoting states' rights. Through segregation, the state anticipated retaining home rule and thus the valuable resources off their coast such as natural gas, seafood, and especially oil. Political leaders fight to preserve state autonomy provided the historical context for Civil Rights history in Louisiana.

Indexing (details)


Subject
American history;
Modern history
Classification
0337: American history
0582: Modern history
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences; Civil rights; Louisiana; Tidelands
Title
Conflicts in race and resources: The Tidelands oil controversy in Louisiana, 1950–1965
Author
Barr, Andrew Foster
Number of pages
80
Publication year
2010
Degree date
2010
School code
1559
Source
MAI 50/03M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781267028174
Advisor
Finley, Keith
Committee member
Hyde, Samuel; Robison, William
University/institution
Southeastern Louisiana University
Department
History and Political Science
University location
United States -- Louisiana
Degree
M.A.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1502340
ProQuest document ID
909024911
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/909024911
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