Abstract/Details

Identifying online communities as self-sustaining ecosystems for fulfilling members' needs


2011 2011

Other formats: Order a copy

Abstract (summary)

The following study shows what current online community members expect of their communities, and how each member plays a vital role in the self-sustaining ecosystem. In the past online communities were self-contained and managed by moderators who would often generate much of the content, and set guidelines for the users within the community. Based on the results of this study members now show that there are two different types of Lurkers (Active and Passive), which make up the majority of all members within a community. Active Lurkers have been identified as those who share content externally and back to their own network, which in return brings new members back to their community. As identified in the study, users must have a motivational need to contribute physically in an online community or; however, having a user's friend already active may increase this potential as well. Based upon the study's results current online community members have established that they should not only be a voice in the evolution of a community, but assist other member types with satisfying their needs or specifically the reason why they joined the online community.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Social psychology;
Communication;
Social structure;
Mass communications
Classification
0451: Social psychology
0459: Communication
0700: Social structure
0708: Mass communications
Identifier / keyword
Communication and the arts; Social sciences; Psychology; Community; Computer-mediated; Maslow, Abraham H.; Motivation; Online community; Theory
Title
Identifying online communities as self-sustaining ecosystems for fulfilling members' needs
Author
Volkman, Elliot S.
Number of pages
55
Publication year
2011
Degree date
2011
School code
0736
Source
MAI 50/03M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781267085375
Advisor
Dare, Alexa; Inagaki, Nobuya
University/institution
Gonzaga University
Department
Communication and Leadership
University location
United States -- Washington
Degree
M.A.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1503394
ProQuest document ID
916582918
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/916582918
Access the complete full text

You can get the full text of this document if it is part of your institution's ProQuest subscription.

Try one of the following:

  • Connect to ProQuest through your library network and search for the document from there.
  • Request the document from your library.
  • Go to the ProQuest login page and enter a ProQuest or My Research username / password.