Abstract/Details

Precision Engineering of Micrometer and Nanometer Droplets for Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy


2011 2011

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Abstract (summary)

The medical community has interest in improving techniques such as occlusion, therapeutics and imaging through the use of liquid perfluorocarbon droplets. The ability to create a monodispersed population of liquid perfluorocarbon droplets would have the added advantage of uniform acoustic activation parameters. A microfluidic device with a flow-focusing orifice allowed for uniform production of perfluoropentane droplets in the micron and submicron diameter range. These droplets are able to be stored for over two weeks while retaining distribution characteristics. The observed activation of the droplets shows the acoustic threshold as a function of droplet diameter with little variability. Results showed that microfluidic technology with a pressure controlled flow regulator will allow for greater manufacturing control of phase-change perfluorocarbons in the micron and sub-micron size range for acoustic droplet vaporization applications.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Biomedical engineering;
Materials science
Classification
0541: Biomedical engineering
0794: Materials science
Identifier / keyword
Applied sciences; Acoustic droplet vaporization; Microfluidics; Monodisperse; Perfluoropentane; Ultrasound
Title
Precision Engineering of Micrometer and Nanometer Droplets for Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy
Author
Martz, Thomas D.
Number of pages
87
Publication year
2011
Degree date
2011
School code
0153
Source
MAI 50/04M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781267191663
Advisor
Dayton, Paul A.
Committee member
Dennis, Robert; Walker, Glenn M.
University/institution
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Department
Materials Science
University location
United States -- North Carolina
Degree
M.S.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1506611
ProQuest document ID
923630605
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/923630605
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