Abstract/Details

Increasing urban open space through pocket parks


2012 2012

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Abstract (summary)

Pocket parks are the smallest type of park, generally less than one-half acre. Pocket parks provide the same economic, environmental and public health benefits that larger parks provide but are unique in that they can be woven into the urban fabric in even the most developed cities. Even though the existing literature treats pocket parks as a single type of park, they should be categorized into three different types: Active, Passive and Bonus. Pocket parks can be developed as privately-owned public spaces, on vacant parcels or in spaces created by public or private development. Municipalities have a variety of tools available to encourage the development and support of pocket parks. For example, public-private partnerships can be used to develop and maintain parks, open space provisions should be included in zoning regulations and communities can elect to impose dedicated taxes to be used for the development and maintenance of pocket parks.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Land Use Planning;
Urban planning
Classification
0536: Land Use Planning
0999: Urban planning
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences; Open space planning; Pocket parks; Public open space; Small parks; Urban open space; Urban parks
Title
Increasing urban open space through pocket parks
Author
LeFlore, Alison J.
Number of pages
94
Publication year
2012
Degree date
2012
School code
0234
Source
MAI 50/04M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781267186157
Advisor
Agyeman, Julian
Committee member
Cousineau, Christine; Witten, Jon
University/institution
Tufts University
Department
Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
M.A.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1506512
ProQuest document ID
923778313
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/923778313
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