Abstract/Details

First-year female college student adjustment: An examination of potential risk and protective factors


2010 2010

Other formats: Order a copy

Abstract (summary)

The purpose of the study was to examine first-generation and non-first-generation female college students adjustment to college by researching both risk factors and protective factors to multifaceted college adjustment. In the study I compared first-generation students to non-first-generation students on selected variables including perceptions of experienced stress, disordered eating, personal empowerment, academic adjustment to college, social adjustment to college, personal-emotional adjustment to college, and goal commitment/institutional attachment to college. I also explored the relationship of selected predictor variables to the level of adjustment to college of first-year female college students. Specifically, the study examined whether certain characteristics identified as risk factors, such as generational status, work status, perceptions of experienced stress, and disordered eating, along with protective factors, such as orientation course experience and personal empowerment, were related to academic adjustment to college, social adjustment to college, personal-emotional adjustment to college, and goal commitment/institutional attachment to college in first-year female college students.

Data were collected from first-time, first-year female college students. Questionnaires were completed by 155 participants. Four separate hierarchical multiple regressions were used to test what risk and protective factors were related to the four types of college adjustment. In the final model, perceptions of experienced stress and disordered eating accounted for a significant amount of variance for personal-emotional adjustment to college. Stress and personal empowerment accounted for a significant amount of variance in the final model for social adjustment to college. In the final model of academic adjustment to college perceptions of experienced stress accounted for a significant amount of variance for academic adjustment to college. Finally, perceptions of experienced stress and personal empowerment accounted for a significant amount of variance for goal commitment/institutional attachment to college. A Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA) was used to test group differences. Comparisons between first-generation female college students and non-first-generation female college students on personal-emotional adjustment, social adjustment, academic adjustment, goal commitment/institutional attachment, disordered eating, perceptions of experienced stress, and personal empowerment were examined. The MANOVA did not reveal a significant group effect for generational status.

KEYWORDS: First-Generation, College Adjustment, Transition, Women, First-Year

Indexing (details)


Subject
Womens studies;
Educational psychology;
Counseling Psychology;
College students;
Risk factors;
Females;
Social psychology
Classification
0453: Womens studies
0525: Educational psychology
0603: Counseling Psychology
Identifier / keyword
Education; Social sciences; Psychology; Adjustment; College transition; First-generation students; Women students
Title
First-year female college student adjustment: An examination of potential risk and protective factors
Author
Wallpe, Melinda Christine
Number of pages
171
Publication year
2010
Degree date
2010
School code
0102
Source
DAI-B 73/06, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781267203502
Advisor
Remer, Pam
University/institution
University of Kentucky
University location
United States -- Kentucky
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3498022
ProQuest document ID
926579882
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/926579882
Access the complete full text

You can get the full text of this document if it is part of your institution's ProQuest subscription.

Try one of the following:

  • Connect to ProQuest through your library network and search for the document from there.
  • Request the document from your library.
  • Go to the ProQuest login page and enter a ProQuest or My Research username / password.