Abstract/Details

HPV knowledge, HPV vaccine awareness and initiation among Hispanics: The role of language, information seeking, and information scanning


2011 2011

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Abstract (summary)

Background. Among Hispanics, the HPV vaccine has the potential to eliminate disparities in cervical cancer incidence and mortality but only if optimal rates of vaccination are achieved. Media can be an important information source for increasing HPV knowledge and awareness of the vaccine. Very little is known about how media use among Hispanics affects their HPV knowledge and vaccine awareness. Even less is known about what differences exist in media use and information processing among English- and Spanish-speaking Hispanics.

Aims. Examine the relationships between three health communication variables (media exposure, HPV-specific information scanning and seeking) and three HPV outcomes (knowledge, vaccine awareness and initiation) among English- and Spanish-speaking Hispanics.

Methods. Cross-sectional data from a survey administered to Hispanic mothers in Dallas, Texas was used for univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Sample used for analysis included 288 mothers of females aged 8-22 recruited from clinics and community events. Dependent variables of interest were HPV knowledge, HPV vaccine awareness and initiation. Independent variables were media exposure, HPV-specific information scanning and seeking. Language was tested as an effect modifier on the relationship between health communication variables and HPV outcomes.

Results. English-speaking mothers reported more media exposure, HPV-specific information scanning and seeking than Spanish-speakers. Scanning for HPV information was associated with more HPV knowledge (OR = 4.26, 95% CI = 2.41 - 7.51), vaccine awareness (OR = 10.01, 95% CI = 5.43 - 18.47) and vaccine initiation (OR = 2.54, 95% CI = 1.09 - 5.91). Seeking HPV-specific information was associated with more knowledge (OR = 2.27, 95% CI = 1.23 - 4.16), awareness (OR = 6.60, 95% CI = 2.74 - 15.91) and initiation (OR = 4.93, 95% CI = 2.64 - 9.20). Language moderated the effect of information scanning and seeking on vaccine awareness.

Discussion. Differences in information scanning and seeking behaviors among Hispanic subgroups have the potential to lead to disparities in vaccine awareness.

Conclusion. Findings from this study underscore health communication differences among Hispanics and emphasize the need to target Spanish language media as well as English language media aimed at Hispanics to improve knowledge and awareness.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Public health;
Mass communications;
Hispanic American studies
Classification
0573: Public health
0708: Mass communications
0737: Hispanic American studies
Identifier / keyword
Health and environmental sciences; Communication and the arts; Social sciences; Health communication; Health disparities; Hispanic American; Information seeking; Papillomavirus vaccine
Title
HPV knowledge, HPV vaccine awareness and initiation among Hispanics: The role of language, information seeking, and information scanning
Author
Stevens, Clare Frey
Number of pages
42
Publication year
2011
Degree date
2011
School code
0219
Source
MAI 50/04M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781267207609
Advisor
Tiro, Jasmin A.
Committee member
Caughy, Margaret O.
University/institution
The University of Texas School of Public Health
Department
Health Promotion & Behavioral Sciences Management
University location
United States -- Texas
Degree
M.P.H.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1506961
ProQuest document ID
927932839
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/927932839
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